Articles Tagged with financial exploitation

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nursing home theft

Public Guardian Says Dementia Resident Was Victim of Financial Corruption for Nearly a Year

Attorneys Steve Levin and Mike Bonamarte continue to offer legal support alongside acting Cook County Public Guardian Charles Golbert for a 97-year-old woman with dementia who was financially exploited by her nursing home care staff for the sum of three quarters a million dollars. It was initially believed the aging resident with dementia and no living relatives, Grace Watanabe, had her life savings of $600,000 taken from her by five care workers at Symphony Residences of Lincoln Park, located at 1366 W Fullerton Ave in Chicago. New information now suggests the amount stolen is actually closer to $750,000.

The legal team for Ms. Watanabe is working hard to recover the stolen money, hopefully with the help of Symphony administrators in releasing all requested documents regarding the financial exploitation. So far, one of the thieves has agreed to repay $15,000 to the victim.

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 nursing home theft

Symphony of Lincoln Park Workers Caught Stealing $600,000 from Resident with Dementia

Levin & Perconti attorneys Steve Levin and Mike Bonamarte have begun work with acting Cook County Public Guardian Charles Golbert on a local financial exploitation case involving a 97-year-old resident with cognitive and memory disorders who required assistance with her finances and trusted the staff workers at Symphony Residences of Lincoln Park, a senior facility where she had been living since 2010. The Cook County Public Guardian has since been appointed the temporary guardian after receiving news by the Illinois Department of Aging and Adult Protective Services of the financial exploitation allegations and suspicious spending between the resident’s bank account and facility employees. The Department receives more than 8,200 reports of financial exploitation involving nursing home residents each year.

It’s believed the aging resident, who previously led a life at an Arizona based Japanese internment camp during World War II against her will, and then worked hard in a career with the federal government, had earned a life savings of $600,000 which she was using to help care for herself at the Symphony facility. Because of her failing independence and need for mental health support, she required assistance in managing her savings but instead a group of workers took advantage. Today, five Symphony workers have been accused of spending their way through the woman’s personal life savings in a yearlong thieving scheme that included cashing checks, making large ATM withdrawals and accessing her funds without her consent. According to the lawsuit:

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elderly financial exploitation

3 Times Nursing Home Staff Stole and Were Caught

It feels as though nursing home staff seem to be caught stealing from vulnerable and sick residents and their facilities more often. Brought on by the nation’s opioid epidemic, staff steal medication and patient drugs most often, but theft can also be in the form of residents’ possessions or finances, and when executives swindle millions from the company and spend it on personal items or other investments. Here is a special review of three times Illinois nursing home staff stole, they were caught, and justice was served.

  1. Drug Theft
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financial exploitation

Investors Claim Rabbi Stole Millions Out of Chicago Nursing Home Deals

Several investors have come forward alleging a Skokie-based investment firm run by a rabbi, stole more than $20 million in a series of nursing home and retirement home funds around the Chicago suburbs in Norridge, South Holland and Morris, along with one Downstate, one in Indiana and the New Jersey facility. The suit alleges the investors are owed a total of more than $24 million counting interest due on their initial contributions.

According to a May 2018 report by The Real Deal, a publication catering towards Chicago real estate professionals, “a similar lawsuit filed in September in federal court in Chicago that alleges violations of the RICO act … In that suit, the investment firm created a series of LLCs to buy and sell nursing homes and retirement homes across the country, including several in the Chicago area and one in Wayne, New Jersey, according to the plaintiffs’ attorney, Craig Tobin.” Soon after, the firm was found to be keeping profits for themselves and not giving any to the investors and filling their pockets by taking from others who rely on nursing homes to survive. The scheme victimized “a 90-year-old Holocaust survivor, school teachers and sophisticated banking institutions,” the suit says. The federal lawsuit seeks more than $20 million in damages.