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Concerns about Care? The Astoria Place Nursing Home

The Astoria Place Living & Rehab Center, owned by the Astoria Place Living and Rehabilitation Center, LLC of suburban Skokie, Illinois, is a somewhat unique nursing home, assisted living, and hospice facility. Located on North California Avenue in Chicago, Astoria Place advertises itself as “a unique living and rehabilitation facility” offering expert “round-the-clock compassionate nursing care,” and therapy. The nursing home also represents itself as “a vibrant multi-cultural community” that is also multilingual, but caters specifically to the Russian community. Its program is “designed with [Russian] heritage in mind.” So while it mentions multiculturalism and its multilingual resident population, Astoria is particularly committed to those of Russian origin. Case in point, part of its informational website is written in Russian. Astoria has 164 beds, and does accept Medicare and Medicaid funding for eligible patients.

According to Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare website, Astoria has favorable ratings both overall, in terms of staffing specifically, and in terms of Registered Nurse staffing as well. Astoria houses significantly more than the average Illinois nursing home, and even more than the average nursing home nationwide. It also boasts nearly 2 full hours of licensed nurse staff hours per resident per day, which is nearly half an hour better than the Illinois state average for care facilities, and 20 minutes more than the national average. This is in particular due to the significant amount of time Registered Nurse hours dedicated daily to each resident.

On the other hand, at Astoria nearly 31% of short-stay residents report experiencing moderate to severe pain, which is nearly double the Illinois average rating for nursing homes across the state, and it is also significantly more than the national average, although practically no residents experience new or worsened pressure ulcers during their stays, which is less than the state and national averages of 1.2%. Not nearly as many short-stay residents received the seasonal flu vaccine, as only 38.3% of Astoria short term residents got the vaccine, while 80% or more received it across the state and the nation. An even greater disparity exists for the vaccine for pneumonia. Additionally, nearly three times as many short-term residents at Astoria received anti-psychotic medications as did the rest of short-stay patients across the state and the country. As discussed on this blog before, there has been a movement of sorts to reduce the use of antipsychotic medications on nursing home residents where it is medically unnecessary.

Astoria has not received any write-ups or fines in 3 full years since it faced penalties after the first quarter of 2011. In October 2011, Astoria received notice from the Illinois Department of Public Health of a Type ‘B’ violation having to do with its methods of transfer and discharge. It was fined $18,800 dollars for this violation, although that amount was eventually reduced. Before that, in 2010 Astoria was hit with notice from the Department of Health of a Type ‘A’ violation. This brought with it conditions placed on the facility’s license to operate in Illinois such that without fixing the problem and complying with state rules and regulations, it could lose its license completely. The financial penalty was $12,500 (although could be reduced by a waiver of the right to a hearing), and the facility was placed on a “quarterly list of violators” published by the Department of Health.

Since its 2010 and 2011 violations, the facility has not had any more reported violations. It continues to service those in need of assisted living and hospice care, most of all from the Russian community.

See Other Blog Posts:

Defrauding Uncle Sam and Disregarding Patients

A Nursing Home Resident Bill of Rights