March 9, 2011

Most Nursing Homes Employ At Least One Criminal

by Levin & Perconti

Last week the New York Times published a summary of a frightening new study that suggests that nursing homes may not be as safe as many suspect.

The research centered on better understanding bad nursing home employees and was led by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services. The department obtained the names of 35,000 nursing home employees and then checked those names with the FBI. The results indicate a concern for all those interested in resident safety.

At least 92 percent of nursing homes were found to employee at least one individual with a criminal conviction. Almost 50 percent had five or more employees with those convictions. Perhaps even more shocking, 16 percent of the convictions occurred after the employee began work at the nursing home—suggesting that many may pose a clear and present risk to the residents.

A nursing professor explained the impact of the results, “This sounds like a very important study. It cries out for additional regulation. Residents in these homes are so vulnerable.”

Anyone who regularly hears news of abuse and neglect at Illinois nursing homes is aware that the root of the problem is typically found in the quality of the employees who are paid to provide the necessary care to these residents. Our Chicago nursing home attorneys at Levin & Perconti know first-hand that nothing will do more to improve the care of our elders at nursing homes than ensuring each and every employee cares deeply about the true mission of the facility: providing the best care possible at all times. Even a single deviation from that standard can have deadly consequences.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Background Checks Proposed for Illinois Nursing Home Employees

Former Nursing Home Employee Sentenced to Jail Following Sexual Assault