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Another nursing home neglect lawsuit filed against Manorcare in Illinois – Department of Public Health cites facility

Twelve days was all it took for Manorcare at Peoria to neglect an 81-year old nursing home resident so badly that he was near death. Steven M. Levin, of Chicago law firm Levin & Perconti, filed a lawsuit today on behalf of the wife of an 81-year old man who died from complications of injuries he sustained in Manorcare at Peoria nursing home.

The 81-year old man was admitted to the facility for a short-term rehabilitation stay after a fall he sustained in his own home. A mere 12 days after the man was admitted, his family arrived to find the man unresponsive and struggling for breath. The man was transferred to a hospital where he was diagnosed with pneumonia, sepsis, acute kidney failure and dehydration. The lawsuit alleges that the staff at Manorcare failed to properly hydrate the man and assess his needs and risk for dehydration. The staff also failed to notify the man’s physician that his condition was deteriorating.

Further investigation revealed the man was needlessly in pain during his stay at the facility as he only received 40% of the pain medications he was prescribed. The Illinois Department of Public Health cited the facility for improper nursing care and failure to notify the resident’s physician and family of his change in condition.

Attorney Steven Levin explained the nature of James’ neglect: “In an unfortunate case of improper nursing care, ManorCare failed to inform James’ doctor or his family that he was not eating or drinking and that his overall physical and mental condition had been rapidly deteriorating. Had the doctor been notified, a plan of intervention could have been established and implemented to prevent James from suffering needlessly. Whenever there is a significant change in a resident’s condition, it is the duty of the facility to notify the doctor and the family about these changes in a timely manner so the resident’s needs can be met with the appropriate standard of care.”